Holy Island

Whilst on holiday we made our second visit to the wonderful Holy Island otherwise known as Lindisfarne.

Lindisfarne Castle
September 2018

It’s a busy place, even out of season as we were, but a very special one.  Visits are determined by the tide and many people head straight for the castle and priory missing the incredible beach.

Nobody much on the beach
Love Lindisfarne

I knew from a brief visit last year that the old boathouses were very photogenic

The pink boat house Lindisfarne
Pretty in pink

But this trip I found some lovely close up shots which provide great inspiration for some textile or other work

 

And some others for work in paint or mixed media.  I usually work in earth colours so these will make a nice change.

 

What to do with what I’ve found

We recently had a long holiday in wonderful Northumbria.  Such a beautiful County – the least populated in England – we met many friendly locals and were blown away (almost literally in a gale that took my husband’s prescription specs into the North Sea!) by the stunning beaches … and by the almost total lack of tourist litter on them.  One day we came across a party of schoolchildren who regularly beachcomb for rubbish – a marvellous initiative.

I did go to two locations (given to me by friends on a Beachcombing Facebook page) where I found some of my sort of treasure.  One of these was Seaham in County Durham – a shrine to sea glass collections from all over the world.  Glass is not “my thing” however – my tastes are altogether less pretty ….

Having now washed and catalogued my finds, the more difficult task is to decide what happens to them next.  As you will see above, one item suggested a face straight away but, as I do not usually work in a representational way, I shall have to see what else comes to mind!

Feeling Bookish

I was recently looking at my various finds and decided that a piece of old number plate reminded me of a book cover.  I rubbed it down and set about making a paper book to go inside.

 

The bound book had covers made from prints and I added a fishing line and weight in colours to match.  However, I was not happy with this – I felt the interior needed to be made from found objects to match the cover.  I had a rummage and found some suitable fibreglass pieces.

My next book project will be to make a mini book using part of this found mobile phone part as the cover ….

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Is it a painting of an object or a “painting”

I recently attended the last of three “Alumni” days at West Dean College.  There were 13 students all working on their own projects and two tutors were on hand to guide and support us in our work.  My passion is for found objects but I struggle with how to move them on in an artistic way when I consider them to be beautiful in their own right.

A year or so ago, I found a strip of seaworn rubber on the beach:

Seatown - rubber 1 Continue reading “Is it a painting of an object or a “painting””

Candida Stevens Gallery, Chichester

In a word – GO!!  The Candida Stevens Gallery is at 12 Northgate, Chichester, West Sussex PO19 1BA (near the roundabout with the fire station) and is open Wednesday – Saturday 10 – 5pm and by appointment until 7th July.  The current exhibition is “Geology of Landscape” showing a range of paintings and Intaglio monoprints by the wonderful Jeremy Gardiner.

You can read more about him on his website but here is an introduction from it: “Jeremy Gardiner’s artistic excavation of the geology of landscape is shaped both by human activity and by the forces of nature. Gardiner interprets, through his painting and printmaking, a variety of landscapes that contain the marks and secrets of their own distant formation, giving them a unique, contemporary depth and beauty. His artistic exploration has taken him from the Jurassic Coast of Dorset to the rugged coast of Cornwall, the Oceanic islands of Brazil, the arid beauty of the island of Milos in Greece and more recently the Lake District and its numerous waterfalls.

Gardiner’s spatially probing and texturally explicit pictures creatively transform the lessons learnt from pioneering modern British landscape painters such as John Tunnard, Ben Nicholson, Peter Lanyon and the American artist Richard Diebenkorn.

Jeremy Gardiner is a graduate of Newcastle University and the Royal College of Art. He exhibits regularly with Paisnel Gallery in St James’s, London. His paintings have been exhibited in Europe, the USA, South America, Japan, Australia and China. He has won numerous awards throughout his career including a Churchill Fellowship, a New York Foundation for the Arts Fellowship and a Harkness Fellowship. Gardiner’s paintings are represented in public and corporate collections including the Victoria and Albert Museum, the Government Art Collection, BNP Paribas, Vincent Masons and Ente Nazionale Idrocarburi.”

I have his book “Unfolding Landscape” and “Pillars of Light” should arrive today.  But, the books cannot do justice to his work – you really do need to see the paintings in real life to appreciate the depth and texture in his work.  Here is one of my favourites –

Golden Cap, Dorset by Jeremy Gardiner

“Golden Cap, Dorset, 2007” – acrylic and jesmonite on birch panel.

Those who know me will understand my love of textured paintings and Jeremy’s use of layers built up out of  acrylic and wood relief or acrylic and/or watercolour and Jesmonite on wood panel in sculptural waves and ridges is very exciting.  He often works on wooden panels which are not driftwood but feel as if they might be and if you watch the videos on his website you can see how a blowtorch and a chisel help him create the lovely surfaces.   Recognisable features of the coast are part of a complex unification of shapes and textures and sometimes there are lovely details of buildings amongst the curves and sweeps of landscape.  Here are a couple more examples:

“Against the Light, Trevose Head, Cornwall, 2016” Acrylic and Jesmonite on poplar panel

Image result for jeremy gardiner pendeen sheer cliffs

“Sheer Cliffs, Pendeen Lighthouse, 2011” – acrylic and jesmonite on poplar panel

I understand that Jeremy’s next project will be Sussex so I look forward to seeing his new work in due course – please go and be inspired – prices from £1,750.

All images produced with the kind permission of Jeremy Gardiner.