Mark Making, Printing and Collage – Part III

I had brought some papers with me and decided next that I would create a series of collages using, for the most part, genuinely “found” papers.  So often the term “found” is used to describe items which are actually “bought” from second hand shops, car boot sales, online auctions etc.  I try to work, as exclusively as possible, with items that I have found along the Chichester Harbour coastline, adding to them when necessary but always using them as the starting point for my work.  The papers used in the pieces below are:

disposable plate; take away coffee cup; take away sandwich wrapper; take away cookie bag; sandpaper; cider cardboard packaging; miscellaneous plastic; paper from an oil filter; and, most importantly, a tide table.

Disposable food service products made from paper, paperboard, and corrugated fibreboard, including cups, plates, bowls, napkins, take away bags, trays, egg cartons, doilies and tray liners, can also include or be coated with plastic to improve wet strength or grease resistance.

So, my collage collection includes hidden plastic and the title “Turning the Tide” refers not only to the use of a local tide table in the work, but also to the fact that I hope that we are now turning the tide in the fight against plastics and other rubbish in our seas.  This is and will remain the core inspiration behind the work that I produce.

Collins Dictionary – “Turn the tide” – to change the general course of events.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Mark Making, Printing and Collage – Part One

I am just back from a four day course with Caroline Bartlett – who was a wonderfully giving and patient tutor who spent time with each of the six students all working in different ways and with very different outcomes.  Thank you Caroline! We had been asked to bring in a collection of about six small objects with which to work during the course.  Here are mine:

Group.jpg

All of these metal items have been collected from the shore around Chichester Harbour and are, from left to right, a baked bean can, an aluminium canister, a shell case from world war 1, a Fanta can, an old paint can, and an aerosol butane gas lighter fuel canister.

To warm up, we were asked to produce a series of continuous line drawings using a variety of media. I chose to overlap my drawings of just one object, the paint can, to start with.

The use of thin paper meant that by turning it over and working on both sides, you could see through from one side to the marks on the other.

Next, I made a template based on the paint can and made a series of cut out’s using some paintings I had already made and brought with me.  Here’s one:

Finally, I thought that the row of objects together made for interesting shapes so went back to the continuous line drawing, using the reverse of a piece of paper already drawn onto:

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

I’ll return to this later when looking at screen printing.

Nearly ready for Chichester Art Trail

After much hard work and preparation we are nearly ready for the Chichester Art Trail which starts tomorrow and runs over the this weekend and next and this Bank Holiday Monday.  My husband Alan (Alan Frost Photography) and I are exhibiting from our studio at Venue 79 in Fishbourne.

Entry will be via the garden (another work in progress!) and the first thing you will see is this:

 

You can come and guess how many lighters I have collected from Chichester Harbour during 2017 but over the years (2008-2017) during the Great British Beach Clean (every 3rd weekend of September volunteers removed and recorded  10,240 cigarette lighters and tobacco pouches.  Source: Marine Conservation Society
Continue reading “Nearly ready for Chichester Art Trail”