And they’re up!

Delighted to say that the hanging is complete and the exhibition “creative redemption” at the Oxmarket Gallery will open at 10.00 tomorrow.

As well as my mixed media collages, assemblages and sculptures, I added a few items that were not for sale but show the visitors the sort of things that I find:

The left hand images shows three oil filters in various stages of composition and the right hand image is of an old workman’s boot to which I have added a found jumble of fishing wire and seaweed.

I am looking forward to spending time with the other artists and chatting to visitors about the exhibition of the next three weeks.

creative redemption: 22 January to 10 February Chichester

I am very excited to say that I will be taking part in “creative redemption” at The Oxmarket  Gallery in Chichester.  As their site says,

“This is a moving exhibition by artists all of whom, in their own way, have benefitted from the restorative powers of their personal creative process. In the honesty of revealing the wounded condition, powerfully sensitive works of art have been born; beautiful in their own right, but also serving to offer empathy, encouragement and hope.

With refreshing honesty, Helen Frost, Christine Habib, Nicola Hancock, Helio Teles and Julie Turner have revealed the wounded condition through their individual response, presenting a highly sensitive and powerful collection of works.”

Here is an example of each of their work:

Christine Habib
Nicola Hancock
helioteles_website
Helio Teles
julieturner_website
Julie Turner

The exhibition runs from  –  Tuesday – Sunday 10 – 4.30 and there is a “Meet the Artist” session with tea and cakes Saturday 2nd February 2 – 4 p.m.  We hope to see you there!

Finding Inspiration …

Most days I walk along the beach – I call it “Beachcombing” but it is just noticing what is around me and picking up any items that “speak” to me (as well as litter and marine debris).  I don’t necessarily know how I will use the pieces that I collect but there will be something about the colour, shape and most often, texture, that draws my attention.  The object might be metal, wood, plastic, cloth, rubber or any manner of material but there is usually a common thread.  This is that the item will have started out as useful – mass produced, neat and tidy.  By the time I find out, when the sea has done it’s work, the once pristine, utilitarian thing has become a unique piece – worn and tattered and no longer of any use to anyone – except me and others who appreciate this kind of thing.  Here are some items from this morning’s walk from Climping to Littlehampton.

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Back home, my finds are all “filed” according to material but only after I have photographed them and added them to the appropriate folder on the computer.  Thus I have two ways of looking for items that I think will work together although I am pretty good at remembering what I have.

Norman Ackroyd C.B.E

Last evening, my husband and I were lucky enough to hear a talk from Norman Ackroyd at the Pallant House Gallery, Chichester.  We are both great admirers of his work, but even if we had not been, we would have marvelled at this octogenarian so full of energy and enthusiasm for the wild and wonderful places he visits each year to study and draw, using watercolour and sugar lift printing in situ.

Born in Leeds in 1938, the son of a butcher, Ackroyd went to Leeds College of Art before enrolling at the London College of Art in 1961.  He was elected Royal Academician in 1988 and Senior Fellow in 2000.  A CBE was awarded in 2007 for Services to Engraving and printing.

Rather than talk about his work or methodology, Norman took us on a guided tour of many of his favourite places, depicting them with examples of his work.  He spoke, not about his own incredible achievements – see www.normanackroyd.com – but about those others who had influenced and impressed him – the Poet Douglas Dunn and the writer    F H White to name but two.  He was such an engaging, intelligent and warm man – we felt we could have listened to him all evening.  With tales of climbing, jumping, sailing, zooming around in helicopters, he is a superhero in so many ways!  His passion for his chosen scenic places, the birds, the history of place were all very evident.  You can view Norman talking about his work on You Tube by following this link.

If you, by chance, are not already aware of his work, here a couple of my favourites:

Skellig Rocks, County Kerry 1987 

Continue reading “Norman Ackroyd C.B.E”

Landscapes in the environment

I’m sure I’m not the only one who sees landscape all around them – but concealed within objects rather than the obvious views around us.  My eyes are just drawn to these beautiful miniatures.

As I live near the coast, these are often captured on boats, but also on buildings, traffic bollards, windows, washed up beach strandings and elsewhere – why not get your eye in while you are walking around – you’ll see so much more!

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAOLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERADell Quay Dec 16 landscape